2020 showed us that successful companies are those that can see into the future. When markets are challenged because of disruptions like the Covid-19 pandemic, or other economic, geopolitical, environmental, or social reasons, the companies that thrive are the ones that build resilience and agility and upgrade their supply chains.

What if you were able to predict not only what customers want to buy in six months, but how much of it and from which retailers? Or which of your customers is most likely to switch to another supplier? You can do this today with predictive modeling.

By looking for…


As feelings of uncertainty increase, visibility into the supply chain can help not only ease peace of mind but can positively affect the bottom line of companies who invest in creating a more agile, more resilient, and more certain supply chain for food.

Even before Covid-19 struck, The 2020 Transparent Path Food Decisions Study found that the three biggest issues guiding shoppers while they browse store aisles today are food safety, organic certifications, and transparency.


Pandemic-era grocery shopping [Photo by Anna Shvets, Pexels]

Times have been great for the U.S. organic sector, with consistent year-over-year growth for the past decade. According to the 2020 Organic Industry Survey by the Organic Trade Association (OTA), organic sales in the food and non-food markets broke records once again in 2019, worth $55.1 billion, up 5 percent from the previous year. Organic food sales hit $50.1 billion, up 4.6 percent, and easily outpaced the general market growth rate of around 2 percent for total food sales.


$1 trillion dollars worth of food is wasted annually [Credit: Taz — https://secure.flickr.com/photos/sporkist/126526910]

Each year, 1.6 billion tons of food worth about $1.2 trillion are lost or go to waste according to The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). This is one-third of the total amount of food produced globally, with many tons of edible food ending up in landfills. In the U.S. alone, consumers, businesses, and farms spend $218 billion a year, or 1.3% of GDP, growing, processing, transporting, and disposing food that is never eaten. This results in massive amounts of wasted water, landfill use, climate pollution, and other environmental damage.

At the same time, one in eight Americans lacks a steady…


On August 1, Thompson International, a family-owned grower/packer in Bakersfield, CA, faced one of the biggest nightmares conceivable for a food producer: their products were being recalled after being tested positive for salmonella. Food safety experts had uncovered 1200 total confirmed cases and over 160 hospitalizations from infections of the Salmonella Newport strain across 47 states and 7 provinces in the U.S. and Canada. Victims’ symptoms typically appear between six hours to six days after exposure.

Since May 1, 2020, this single producer/processor had shipped whole onions — and provided whole onions and onions for processing into co-mingled foods across…


A person sifts through dry soil
A person sifts through dry soil
In the last 150 years, nearly half of the most productive soil has disappeared. Photo by FORREST CAVALE on Unsplash.

The global food industry is leaving $2 trillion dollars on the table. Or more specifically, in landfills and exhausted fields, in deforested areas and nutrient-clogged waterways.

This is part two of two articles focused on the astounding economic benefits of improving food production practices, including farming practices, energy use, and improved systems outlined in Drawdown: The Most Comprehensive Plan Ever Proposed To Reverse Global Warming.

Project Drawdown was founded by author and environmentalist Paul Hawken in 2014 to “map, measure, and model the most substantive solutions to stop global warming, and to communicate those findings to the world.” Hawken gathered…


Photo by Hermes Rivera on Unsplash

The global food industry is leaving $2 trillion dollars on the table. Or more specifically, in landfills and exhausted fields, in deforested areas and nutrient-clogged waterways.

This is part one of two articles focused on the astounding economic benefits of improving food production practices, including farming practices, energy use, and improved systems outlined in Drawdown: The Most Comprehensive Plan Ever Proposed To Reverse Global Warming.

Project Drawdown was founded by author and environmentalist Paul Hawken in 2014 to “map, measure, and model the most substantive solutions to stop global warming, and to communicate those findings to the world.” Hawken gathered…

Paulé Wood

I am the Chief Storyteller for Transparent Path, a food traceability startup combining IoT sensors, digital packaging, and a blockchain data ecosystem.

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